Something to Talk About: How to Get Referrals by Peleg Top

How to Get Referrals

how to get referralsAsking your clients for referrals may seem awkward, but you definitely don’t want to be in the position of forwarding your résumé through your cousin’s roommate’s dentist! To generate quality referrals, you simply need to provide a good service and then ask. Business development coach Peleg Top’s article “Something to Talk About” offers 4 strategies for generating great referrals. Learn how to get referrals in the article excerpt below or read the complete article on ArtistsMarketOnline.com.

Keep creating and good luck!

Mary

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Something to Talk About: 4 Strategies for Generating Referrals by Peleg Top

Your marketing toolbox probably includes your blog, e-newsletters, social media, face-to-face networking—all the usual suspects. But to really grow your business, developing a steady stream of qualified, intentional referrals should be the tool at the top of the box. Of all your marketing initiatives, generating referrals takes the least amount of time, costs almost nothing and yields the greatest results.

If you want to attract new business by having your current clients spread the word, you need to help them recommend you.

When a close friend tells you about a new restaurant, there’s a pretty good chance that you’ll take the recommendation seriously and give the place a try, right? Now turn that power of referrals from “trusted others” into a marketing force that works for your design business. Your most satisfied, enthusiastic clients are your biggest fans, and each of them also is a trusted other for an untapped network of potential clients who are just waiting to hear about you from their friends.

If you don’t pay attention to who’s talking about you and what they’re saying, you may attract the wrong prospects—or none at all.

Good word of mouth can transform a business. But, if you don’t pay attention to who’s talking about you and what they’re saying, you may attract the wrong prospects—or none at all. Your goal in generating referrals is to control the process. And for that to happen, you need a system—one that produces qualified referrals from your best clients on an ongoing basis.

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A referral system will be most effective if it supplements an existing marketing machine for your business. So, for the sake of this article, I’m going to assume that you have a marketing infrastructure in place that supports your expertise and showcases your talent. What you say about your business will support what other people say about you. Furthermore, your own marketing will encourage referrals through the effect of what I like to call “The Three Rs”—when people see your marketing they react, remember and recommend.

Step 1: Serve

When you truly serve your clients and help them transform their businesses and experience success, they will naturally want to tell others. Serving your clients well and doing exceptional work is the foundation to cultivating good referrals. As simple as it sounds, holding yourself to the highest standards and providing the best work possible to every one of your clients is step No. 1 in the process. Clients won’t refer you based on a merely good experience; they refer based on an exceptional experience. Ask yourself: “Are my clients astonished by my work?” If you strive to wow people with the work you create, you’ll naturally put the wheels of referrals in motion.

Step 2: Ask

Many creative professionals are either afraid to ask their clients to refer them or don’t ask properly. They worry that they might come across as desperate, so they don’t ask at all. Or they ask in such a general way (“Would you mind handing my business card out to people you know?”) that the client doesn’t know what to do with the request.

You can get over these feelings if you re-frame the intent of your request. Feelings of desperation come from thinking that you’re asking the client to help you. Instead, frame the “ask” as an offer to be a resource for helping your client help somebody else. Then, further help your client by being specific about exactly the kinds of services that you can provide to the people they might refer you to.

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Step 3: Thank

When you finish a major project, promptly and effusively thank your client for their business, and use that as an opportunity to open the door to referrals. With the thank you, ask them if they’d be open to passing along some information about your agency (most would be delighted) and give them the tools to do so. Send them brochures, business cards or any other promotional items that would help them make a connection on your behalf. Remember, your raving fans become your marketing agents. Help them help you.

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Step 4: Inform

This part of the referral process is the one most creative professionals overlook, and yet they still somehow hope that others will think about them. How would anyone who refers you know the truly great impact of your work if you don’t tell them about it?
. . . .

The easiest, cheapest, most effective tool in your marketing toolbox is waiting to be used. You’re likely sitting on a database of raving fans who would be happy to refer you to others if you reminded them that you’re interested and available. You’re already providing great service, right? Ask your best clients to connect you with someone else who needs your help, and thank them when they do. Finally, when you’ve started work with that new customer, get back to the old client with regular information on how it’s going. You’ll be keeping the wheels of referrals in motion.

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Peleg Top is a business development coach and professional mentor to creative entrepreneurs. He specializes in helping creative agency owners improve their business and marketing skills and ­become better leaders. www.pelegtop.com

Excerpted from the September 2010 issue of HOW magazine. Used with the kind permission of HOW magazine, a publication of F+W Media, Inc. Visit www.howdesign.com to subscribe.

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